peira:

Georgia O’Keeffe:  Series No. 4 (1918)

peira:

Georgia O’KeeffeSeries No. 4 (1918)

Reblogged from Peira's blog
darksilenceinsuburbia:

 Andrew Zhao. Impression of North West Qinghai, 2009.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

 Andrew Zhao. Impression of North West Qinghai, 2009.

lisbokt:

So far (Taken with Instagram at The Geek Group)

lisbokt:

So far (Taken with Instagram at The Geek Group)

Reblogged from Lis was here
What we call a home is merely any place that succeeds in making more consistently available to us the important truths which the wider world ignores, or which our distracted and irresolute selves have trouble holding on to. As we write, so we build: to keep a record of what matters to us.
— From The Architecture of Happiness by Alain de Botton. (via carpentrix)
Reblogged from Carpentrix
jacobvanloon:

monotype 3/3 | 2010Jacob van Loon

jacobvanloon:

monotype 3/3 | 2010

Jacob van Loon

Reblogged from smoking megaphone
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Yoakim Bélanger. Inside Revolution XLVI. Mixed Media on oxidized steel, 96” X 72”.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Yoakim Bélanger. Inside Revolution XLVI. Mixed Media on oxidized steel, 96” X 72”.

Reblogged from

heyoscarwilde:

When We Was Fab

illustrations by Gregory Manchess :: via muddycolors.blogspot.com

Reblogged from Hey Oscar Wilde!
fredericfau:


Frédéric Fau,
Untitled (2012)
30 x 40 cm
enamel and acrylic on canvas

fredericfau:

Frédéric Fau,

Untitled (2012)

30 x 40 cm

enamel and acrylic on canvas

Reblogged from Frédéric Fau

devidsketchbook:

Forest Blending Acrylic Glass Statues

Imagine walking through a forest and seeing just a glimpse of these invisible figures! They’re the creative work of artist Rob Mulholland, who makes these sculptures out of mirrored Perspex (or acrylic glass). It has been called the Predator effect after the 1987 film where an alien life form seamlessly blends into its background. Mulholland has previously installed these chameleon-like figures in the woods around Alloa, Loch Ard and the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland.

Mulholland told BBC Scotland that the key to the effect was creating a distorted reflection. “It alters reality, one moment you see them and the next moment they blend in. There’s an ambiguity to it - it doesn’t answer all the questions.”


Reblogged from